Neighbourhood Petite-Patrie

History

1707 1780

1707-1780

Côte-de-la-Visitation

Granted to the Sulpicians in 1707, the territory covered by today's Petite-Patrie was originally known as Côte-de-la-Visitation. A toll station was built here granting access to the Petite-Côte Road for those wishing to travel to the north of the island.

Image : HM_ARC_005233

Atlas of the City and Island of Montreal Canada, Villages of Côte Saint-Louis, Saint-Louis-du-Mile-End and Côte-des-Neiges
1879
45 cm
72 cm
© Dinu Bumbaru, © Héritage Montréal


1707-1780

Côte-de-la-Visitation

Granted to the Sulpicians in 1707, the territory covered by today's Petite-Patrie was originally known as Côte-de-la-Visitation. A toll station was built here granting access to the Petite-Côte Road for those wishing to travel to the north of the island.

1781 1892

1781-1892

A territory with fluctuating boundaries

Limestone deposits began to be exploited here in 1780, including those of Montreal's well-known hard, grey limestone. At the same time, the first agricultural lands began to be farmed by their owners: Comte, Boyer, Hughes, Dorion, and Greaves.

The borders of Petite-Patrie fluctuated widely in the 19th century. First composed of the villages of Côte-de-la-Visitation and Côte-Saint-Louis, the district had grown to include the following four areas by 1878: the village of Côte-de-la-Visitation, the municipality of Saint-Louis du Mile-End, the village of Côte-Saint-Louis, and the southern end of Sault-au-Récollet. Today, the neighbourhood stretches between Jean Talon and Bélanger streets to the north, the Canadian Pacific railroad line to the south and west, and Iberville Street to the east.

Image : HM_ARC_005219

Atlas of the City and Island of Montreal Canada, Villages of Saint-Jean-Baptiste, Côte Saint-Louis and Saint-Louis-du-Mile-End
1879
45 cm
72 cm
© Dinu Bumbaru, © Héritage Montréal


1781-1892

A territory with fluctuating boundaries

Limestone deposits began to be exploited here in 1780, including those of Montreal's well-known hard, grey limestone. At the same time, the first agricultural lands began to be farmed by their owners: Comte, Boyer, Hughes, Dorion, and Greaves.

The borders of Petite-Patrie fluctuated widely in the 19th century. First composed of the villages of Côte-de-la-Visitation and Côte-Saint-Louis, the district had grown to include the following four areas by 1878: the village of Côte-de-la-Visitation, the municipality of Saint-Louis du Mile-End, the village of Côte-Saint-Louis, and the southern end of Sault-au-Récollet. Today, the neighbourhood stretches between Jean Talon and Bélanger streets to the north, the Canadian Pacific railroad line to the south and west, and Iberville Street to the east.

1893 1930

1893-1930

The neighbourhood's east and west ends develop along parallel lines

The arrival of the tramway of the Montreal Park & Island Railway Company in 1893, the decline in infant mortality, and the massive immigration resulting from industrial expansion accelerated development in the west end in a diversified and disorderly fashion. People moving to this sector found a residential refuge that was isolated from industry yet closely linked to it by the tramway. During this period, the founding of the following churches reflected the existence of the three major cultural groups: Saint-Édouard (1895), Saint-Jean-de-la-Croix (1900), Saint-Jean-Berchmans (1908), Notre-Dame-de-la-Défense (1910), Shaw Memorial Methodist (1900), Amherst Park Congregational (1899), and St. Albans American (1898). Developers advertised “the pleasures of country life, clean air, and tranquility, far from the noise of the city.”

Between 1910 and 1930, businesses sprang up along Saint-Hubert Street (now the Plaza Saint-Hubert) and Saint Lawrence Boulevard. Near the railway tracks to the south, the De Lorimier and Martineau quarries were exploited, while the following industrial buildings housed many jobs: the L. Villeneuve & Co. sawmill (1910), the municipal workrooms (1910), the Catelli Factory (1911), and the Coca-Cola Building (1929-30). The garages and warehouses of the Montreal Street Railway Company (now belonging to the STM) were built around 1900.

Image : HM_ARC_003337

Millen tram
January 16 1959
© Fonds de Commission de transport de Montréal, Archives de la STM(S611.1.23_19), © Héritage Montréal


1893-1930

The neighbourhood's east and west ends develop along parallel lines

The arrival of the tramway of the Montreal Park & Island Railway Company in 1893, the decline in infant mortality, and the massive immigration resulting from industrial expansion accelerated development in the west end in a diversified and disorderly fashion. People moving to this sector found a residential refuge that was isolated from industry yet closely linked to it by the tramway. During this period, the founding of the following churches reflected the existence of the three major cultural groups: Saint-Édouard (1895), Saint-Jean-de-la-Croix (1900), Saint-Jean-Berchmans (1908), Notre-Dame-de-la-Défense (1910), Shaw Memorial Methodist (1900), Amherst Park Congregational (1899), and St. Albans American (1898). Developers advertised “the pleasures of country life, clean air, and tranquility, far from the noise of the city.”

Between 1910 and 1930, businesses sprang up along Saint-Hubert Street (now the Plaza Saint-Hubert) and Saint Lawrence Boulevard. Near the railway tracks to the south, the De Lorimier and Martineau quarries were exploited, while the following industrial buildings housed many jobs: the L. Villeneuve & Co. sawmill (1910), the municipal workrooms (1910), the Catelli Factory (1911), and the Coca-Cola Building (1929-30). The garages and warehouses of the Montreal Street Railway Company (now belonging to the STM) were built around 1900.

Image : HM_ARC_004543

Saint-Jean-Berchmans Church

©Fondation du patrimoine religieux du Québec, ©Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_000376

"Facciata nord-ovest della chiesa, Madonna della Difesa - Notre Dame de la Défense"

10.3 cm
15.3 cm


Image : HM_ARC_000726

Église Saint-Édouard, façade

18.3 cm
12.7 cm


Image : HM_ARC_001041

Rue Saint-Hubert en direction nord, à partir de la rue Beaubien



Image : HM_ARC_002239

Old stable on des Carrières Street

© Ville de Montréal. Gestion de documents et archives (U-1017-4), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_000733

Ancienne usine Catelli

12.3 cm
17.5 cm


1931 1970

1931-1970

The economic crisis

To relieve the unemployment problems resulting from the Great Depression of the 1930s, public utilities buildings were constructed, including the Jean-Talon Station, the North Market (now the Jean-Talon Market), the first garbage incinerator, the fire station, and the Shamrock police station. This period was marked by the closing of several quarries, which were converted into municipal garbage dumps and then, in the 1950s, into public parks.

To the east, modest single-family dwellings built in the 1940s and 1950s reflect the relatively good conditions enjoyed by workers.

Image : HM_ARC_001080

Marché Jean-Talon



1931-1970

The economic crisis

To relieve the unemployment problems resulting from the Great Depression of the 1930s, public utilities buildings were constructed, including the Jean-Talon Station, the North Market (now the Jean-Talon Market), the first garbage incinerator, the fire station, and the Shamrock police station. This period was marked by the closing of several quarries, which were converted into municipal garbage dumps and then, in the 1950s, into public parks.

To the east, modest single-family dwellings built in the 1940s and 1950s reflect the relatively good conditions enjoyed by workers.

Image : HM_ARC_002237

Incinerator, des Carrières Street

© Ville de Montréal. Gestion de documents et archives (U-1017-6), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002476

Fire station 47, facade
1975
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Dossier rue 17-10-08-04 R3597.2), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002466

Corner of Saint-Hubert and Fleurimont Street, Rosemont
December 1940
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (17-09-08-04 R-3218.31), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002480

Plaza Saint-Hubert, lit up at night
Circa 1960
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (A-32-11, document électronique 373), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002467

Corner of Saint-Hubert and Saint-Zotique Street
September 1948
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (17-09-08-04 R-3218.31), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002473

Corner of Saint-Denis and Saint-Zotique Street
1948
12.7 cm
17.7 cm
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Dossier rue 17-10-08-04 R3597.2, © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002464

Saint-Hubert Street (between Bellechasse and Beaubien)
1937
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (151-6-2-3 VM98 S4 SS1 D4), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_000302

Saint-Denis, Vue aérienne vers le nord

20.2 cm
25.2 cm


1971 2008

1971-2008

Urban revitalization

In the 1970s, residential renovation subsidies made it possible to rehabilitate many housing units. The municipal workrooms were converted into social housing, and the new incinerator, opened in 1969 and now disused, was also given a new lease on life. At the same time, the Millen tramway was replaced by a metro line following basically the same route.

In the 1980s, the neighbourhood attracted more and more immigrants - generally renters and relatively poor - who came from Latin American countries, Haiti, and Asian countries (especially Vietnam). This population contributed to the social diversity of the sector, whose traditional population was growing older and less family oriented.

Today, Petite-Patrie has taken on a whole new aspect. Since the late 1990s, neighbourhood organizations have helped revitalize the sector. In 2000, efforts were made to attract new businesses to the Plaza Saint-Hubert, and the growing number of families has helped revive the neighbourhood spirit.

Image : HM_ARC_002484

Building with municipal workshops, Rosemont Boulevard

© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (U-757-4, document électronique 379), © Héritage Montréal


1971-2008

Urban revitalization

In the 1970s, residential renovation subsidies made it possible to rehabilitate many housing units. The municipal workrooms were converted into social housing, and the new incinerator, opened in 1969 and now disused, was also given a new lease on life. At the same time, the Millen tramway was replaced by a metro line following basically the same route.

In the 1980s, the neighbourhood attracted more and more immigrants - generally renters and relatively poor - who came from Latin American countries, Haiti, and Asian countries (especially Vietnam). This population contributed to the social diversity of the sector, whose traditional population was growing older and less family oriented.

Today, Petite-Patrie has taken on a whole new aspect. Since the late 1990s, neighbourhood organizations have helped revitalize the sector. In 2000, efforts were made to attract new businesses to the Plaza Saint-Hubert, and the growing number of families has helped revive the neighbourhood spirit.

Image : HM_ARC_002482

Covered sidewalks, Saint-Hubert Plaza

© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (A-813-7, document électronique 378), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002489

Sketch of the covered sidewalks, Plaza Saint-Hubert

© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (U-3139, document électronique 429), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002793

Père-Marquette Park

© Ville de Montréal, SDCQMVDE, Direction des grands parcs et de la nature en ville, © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_001883

St. Hubert St., one of Canada's largest shopping centers

8.9 cm
14 cm
© Dinu Bumbaru, © Héritage Montréal