Neighbourhood Côte-des-Neiges

History

1653 1663

1653-1663

The natives crossing Rivière des Prairies in the days of Marguerite Bourgeoys passed through these virgin woodlands before climbing the mountain.

1664 1829

1664-1829

A pathway separating the two summits of Mount Royal, Côte-des-Neiges Road was part of a network of roads created by the Sulpicians to organize the development of the territory. The settlement sprang up in 1698 with the installation of some thirty censitaires, or tenants, and the construction of a flour mill by the Sulpicians. Unlike on the rest of the island, plots of land were laid out parallel to Mount Royal to provide access to Raimbault Creek, which had as its course the present-day Côte-des-Neiges Road. The land was fertile, and the plant life rich and varied: it was a farmer's paradise.

In 1737, tanners began to be attracted by the bountiful supply of running water, and, over time, leather making became the region's number one industry. Although fairly close to the city, Côte-des-Neiges was still primarily a rural area, but the construction of the first chapel school in 1814 followed by the opening of the first tavern in 1827 signalled the changes to come.

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Atlas of the City and Island of Montreal Canada, Village Rivière-des-Prairies, Village Sainte-Geneviève, Village Côte-des-Neiges
1879
45 cm
36 cm
© Dinu Bumbaru, © Héritage Montréal


1664-1829

A pathway separating the two summits of Mount Royal, Côte-des-Neiges Road was part of a network of roads created by the Sulpicians to organize the development of the territory. The settlement sprang up in 1698 with the installation of some thirty censitaires, or tenants, and the construction of a flour mill by the Sulpicians. Unlike on the rest of the island, plots of land were laid out parallel to Mount Royal to provide access to Raimbault Creek, which had as its course the present-day Côte-des-Neiges Road. The land was fertile, and the plant life rich and varied: it was a farmer's paradise.

In 1737, tanners began to be attracted by the bountiful supply of running water, and, over time, leather making became the region's number one industry. Although fairly close to the city, Côte-des-Neiges was still primarily a rural area, but the construction of the first chapel school in 1814 followed by the opening of the first tavern in 1827 signalled the changes to come.

Image : HM_ARC_003732

Map of Notre-Dame-des-Neiges
1778
© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, © Héritage Montréal


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Map of village on Côte-des-Neiges Road and irregular lots

© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (G1144 M65G475 CAR), ©Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_004361



© Royal Ontario Museum, © Héritage Montréal


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Old houses dating from 1692 (Côte-des-Neiges road)

© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Albums de rues E.-Z. Massicotte – MAS 1-175-b, © Héritage Montréal


1830 1889

1830-1889

In 1830, Côte-des-Neiges Road was linked to other roads, such as Côte-Sainte-Catherine and Côte-Saint-Luc (now Queen Mary), and the area was becoming a popular rural retreat.

Montreal's economic elite founded snowshoe clubs and a hunt club to take advantage of this green oasis, where small hotels began to appear in 1840. Attracted to its natural environment, tourists and city dwellers alike came to practice various sports, including snowshoeing, tennis, horseback riding on the mountain, and croquet. The Fabrique Notre-Dame opened its cemetery here, and a small Presbyterian church was built on Côte-Sainte-Catherine Road.

The leather-making industry was becoming more and more profitable, and Pierre Claude, mayor of Côte-des-Neiges from 1862 to 1885, owned the largest tannery, located on the site of the present-day Notre-Dame-des Neiges school. Just across the street, the equally busy Benjamin Goyer tannery sold wool and leather. On the down side, the tanneries polluted the water and produced disagreeable odours that permeated the air.

In 1884, a passenger railway linked the downtown core with Côte-Sainte-Catherine Road. In 1889, the area was formed of two municipalities: upper (Town) and lower (Village) Côte-des-Neiges. They were incorporated into Montreal in 1908 and 1910 respectively.

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Côte-des-Neiges, Montréal, QC, 1859
1859
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal


1830-1889

In 1830, Côte-des-Neiges Road was linked to other roads, such as Côte-Sainte-Catherine and Côte-Saint-Luc (now Queen Mary), and the area was becoming a popular rural retreat.

Montreal's economic elite founded snowshoe clubs and a hunt club to take advantage of this green oasis, where small hotels began to appear in 1840. Attracted to its natural environment, tourists and city dwellers alike came to practice various sports, including snowshoeing, tennis, horseback riding on the mountain, and croquet. The Fabrique Notre-Dame opened its cemetery here, and a small Presbyterian church was built on Côte-Sainte-Catherine Road.

The leather-making industry was becoming more and more profitable, and Pierre Claude, mayor of Côte-des-Neiges from 1862 to 1885, owned the largest tannery, located on the site of the present-day Notre-Dame-des Neiges school. Just across the street, the equally busy Benjamin Goyer tannery sold wool and leather. On the down side, the tanneries polluted the water and produced disagreeable odours that permeated the air.

In 1884, a passenger railway linked the downtown core with Côte-Sainte-Catherine Road. In 1889, the area was formed of two municipalities: upper (Town) and lower (Village) Côte-des-Neiges. They were incorporated into Montreal in 1908 and 1910 respectively.

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Montreal, from below Côte des Neiges toll gate, QC, 1859

© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal


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Capitualtion cottage, Côte-des-Neiges road
1871
© Canadian Architecture Collection, McGill University Library, © Héritage Montréal


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John Leeming house and grounds, Côte des Neiges Road, Montreal, 1859
Circa 1859
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal


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Lumkin's Hotel, Cote des Neiges, Montreal, QC, 1896
1896
10 cm
12 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal


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Engraving showing snowshoers resting after a race

© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, revue d'un autre siècle #5958, © Héritage Montréal


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Maison du Club de Chasse à Courre Canadien
1905
© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Albums de rues E.-Z. Massicotte – MAS 1-173-b, © Héritage Montréal


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Fox hunting, Montreal Hunt Club, Montreal, QC, 1906
1906
20 cm
25 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal


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Entrance to Catholic Cemetery, Côte des Neiges Road, Montreal

8.8 cm
13.6 cm
© Dinu Bumbaru, © Héritage Montréal


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Côte-des-Neiges, Montréal
Circa 1845
17.5 cm
25 cm
© Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (56.343), Jean-Guy Kérouac (photograph), © Héritage Montréal


1890 1945

1890-1945

With the annexation of Côte-des-Neiges to the City of Montreal, real urban development began to transform the landscape. This process was accelerated in 1925 with the construction of a sewer system, a water filtration plant, and an expanded road network. The neighbourhood was becoming increasingly residential, but it was also home to major religious communities such as the Sainte-Croix congregation (present since 1869), the Company of Jesus, and Catholic, Anglican, and Presbyterian churches. In 1920, the area was served by two tramway lines, and many institutional buildings were constructed: colleges, the University of Montreal, places of worship, and hospitals. With these new institutions came a growing population, and Côte-des-Neiges began to shift from a traditional rural economy to a service economy.

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Map of the Côte-des-Neiges reservoir (with the proposal of the first Côte-des-Neiges reservoir, completed in 1893)

© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, © Héritage Montréal


1890-1945

With the annexation of Côte-des-Neiges to the City of Montreal, real urban development began to transform the landscape. This process was accelerated in 1925 with the construction of a sewer system, a water filtration plant, and an expanded road network. The neighbourhood was becoming increasingly residential, but it was also home to major religious communities such as the Sainte-Croix congregation (present since 1869), the Company of Jesus, and Catholic, Anglican, and Presbyterian churches. In 1920, the area was served by two tramway lines, and many institutional buildings were constructed: colleges, the University of Montreal, places of worship, and hospitals. With these new institutions came a growing population, and Côte-des-Neiges began to shift from a traditional rural economy to a service economy.

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House in Côte-des-Neiges neighbourhood

18.7 cm
25.2 cm
© Société d’histoire de la Côte-des-Neiges, © Héritage Montréal


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John Swail's house, Côte-des-Neiges

20.2 cm
25.2 cm
© Société d’histoire de la Côte-des-Neiges, © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_003927

McKenna family house, Côte-des-Neiges Road

20.2 cm
25.2 cm
© Société d’histoire de la Côte-des-Neiges, © Héritage Montréal


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Desmarchais House, Côte-des-Neiges road
1924
© Canadian Architecture Collection, McGill University Library, © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_003919

Tram station, Côte-des-Neiges

20.5 cm
24.5 cm
© Archives de la STM (2-920-001), © Héritage Montréal


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Cabbage field in Côte des Neiges, Montreal, QC, about 1930
Circa 1930
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal


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Decelles Avenue, Côte-des-Neiges

© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec(CP 3014),©Héritage Montréal


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Côte-des-Neiges House
1989-1990
6 cm
6 cm
© Brian Merrett, www.archiguides.com, réf.009X, © Héritage Montréal


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First part of Collège Notre-Dame
Circa 1885
© Collège Notre-Dame, © Héritage Montréal


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Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf

20 cm
25.1 cm
© Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf, © Héritage Montréal


1946 2008

1946-2008

After World War II, the last remaining farmland began to disappear, and the neighbourhood attracted large numbers of immigrants. The Irish from Griffintown, near the Lachine Canal, moved north to Côte-des-Neiges and founded St. Kevin's Parish. The Jews, who had opened a hospital here in 1934, built a synagogue and a cemetery. Eastern Europeans flocked to the neighbourhood and, over the years, they were joined by other cultural communities. Immigrants from Vietnam, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh settled here, either permanently or on their way to somewhere else. Today, more than 65 percent of the population belongs to cultural communities. The area is still largely residential, with many rental housing units - then called

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Public Library and Côte-des-Neiges Maison de la culture
May 18 1983
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Microfiche U-3019-17), © Héritage Montréal


1946-2008

After World War II, the last remaining farmland began to disappear, and the neighbourhood attracted large numbers of immigrants. The Irish from Griffintown, near the Lachine Canal, moved north to Côte-des-Neiges and founded St. Kevin's Parish. The Jews, who had opened a hospital here in 1934, built a synagogue and a cemetery. Eastern Europeans flocked to the neighbourhood and, over the years, they were joined by other cultural communities. Immigrants from Vietnam, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh settled here, either permanently or on their way to somewhere else. Today, more than 65 percent of the population belongs to cultural communities. The area is still largely residential, with many rental housing units - then called

Image : HM_ARC_002435

Corner of Côte-des-Neiges and Queen Mary Road
Circa 1955
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Microfiche U-697-10), © Héritage Montréal


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Côte-des-Neiges Road in 1955
November 18 1955
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Microfiche U-695-3), © Héritage Montréal


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Ski lift and ski jump, Côte-des-Neiges
February 9 1972
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Microfiche U-1102-9), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002449

Aerial view of ski jump, Côte-des-Neiges
February 4 1978
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Microfiche BC-228-64), © Héritage Montréal


Image : HM_ARC_002461

Queen Mary Road and Côte-des-Neiges towards the east
1937
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (VM98 S4 SS1 D4), © Héritage Montréal


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Aerial view of Kent Park, Côte-des-Neiges
September 30 1976
© Ville de Montréal, Gestion de documents et archives (Microfiche BC-209-187), © Héritage Montréal


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Aerial view towards the south of Université de Montreal

© Ville de Montréal. Gestion de documents et archives (R-4034.2), © Héritage Montréal


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Aerial view of Côte-des-Neiges metro station model
June 17 1983
2.3 cm
3.4 cm
© Fonds de Commission de transport de Montréal, Archives de la STM(S10/10.4.1), © Héritage Montréal


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View of the Côte-des-Neiges neighbourhood near the Décarie expressway

© Arrondissement Côte-des-Neiges/Notre-Dame-de-Grâce/Patrick Deslandes, © Héritage Montréal


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View of the Côte-des-Neiges neighbourhood with Saint-Joseph Oratory

© Arrondissement Côte-des-Neiges/Notre-Dame-de-Grâce/Patrick Deslandes, © Héritage Montréal