Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine Bridge/Tunnel


History

Make way for the automobile! Nearly a century after the Canadian Pacific Railway was built, with 5,000 km of track laid from the Atlantic to the Pacific, the road network was growing and modernizing.

Progress came at a cost, however. To improve the flow of traffic between the South Shore and the island of Montreal, some villages were sacrificed. The residents of Longue-Pointe can't easily forget that the construction of the Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine bridge-tunnel in the early 1960s meant the demolition of homes, businesses, and their parish church, Saint-Francois-d'Assise. While some houses were moved, residents could only watch helplessly as their village that dated back to 1724 was destroyed.

Inaugurated on March 11, 1967, by Quebec Premier Daniel Johnson, a few short days before the opening of Expo 67, the bridge-tunnel runs underneath the river for 1.5 km. It was inspired by similar structures in Cuba and British Columbia, and used a Danish building technique for some of its sections—clear signs that Quebec had entered the global age.

Image : HM_ARC_003214

Entrance to the Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine Tunnel-Bridge

© Transports Québec © Héritage Montréal

Image : HM_ARC_003221

Old control center of the Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine Tunnel-Bridge

© Transports Québec © Héritage Montréal