Neighbourhood - Public spaces

Saint-Henri Square


History

In 1890, some fifteen years after its founding and on the initiative of its mayor, Eugène Guay, the town of Saint-Henri purchased land bordering Saint-Antoine Street from the Mackay estate. The municipality wished to create a public square for the enjoyment of the sector's economic elite. Between 1893 and 1895, a fountain and a statue of Jacques Cartier were installed in what was then known as Jacques Cartier Square.

At the turn of the 20th century, upper middle-class homes, including that of Mayor Guay, were built around the square in accordance with the architectural rules stipulated in the deed of conveyance, including the requirement that building facades be of dimension stone. When the Georges Etienne Cartier Park was created in 1910, the square was renamed Saint Henri to avoid confusion with the name “Cartier.” In the 1960s, the square was redeveloped as the middle class gradually moved away from the area. The monument to Jacques Cartier was slated to be moved to Mount Royal, but residents protested the move. Water had infiltrated the interior of the fragile monument. After it crumbled in 1963 and again in 1979, it was replaced by a copy. The square bordered by Agnès, Saint-Antoine, Laporte, and Place Guay streets is today a peaceful public space.

Image : HM_ARC_005253

Jacques Cartier Monument

8.6 cm x 13.8 cm
© Dinu Bumbaru, © Héritage Montréal

Image : HM_ARC_001956

Jacques Cartier Monument

14 cm x 9 cm
© Dinu Bumbaru, © Héritage Montréal