Neighbourhood - Buildings

Musée du Château Dufresne



History

Between 1915 and 1918, brothers Oscar and Marius Dufresne had a magnificent residence composed of two adjoining houses built for themselves. The two men were involved with the project to clean up and beautify the city of Maisonneuve and believed that public buildings should be architecturally magnificent. The two families lived in the mansion until 1948, when it was purchased by the Fathers of the Holy Cross to provide additional classroom space for the Sainte-Croix Externat Classique (day school) and renamed the Pavillon Dufresne. In 1957, the property was acquired by the City of Montreal, and it housed the museum of contemporary art for several years. After the museum moved out, the building was abandoned and vandalized, only to be restored soon after being named a historic monument in 1976, when it became known as the Château Dufresne. Until 1997, it housed Montreal's museum of decorative arts.

Since 1999, the mansion has served as a museum - the Musée du Château Dufresne - devoted to Quebec and Canadian history - particularly the history of the neighbourhood, the mansion, and its collections, which include works by Guido Nincheri.

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Château Dufresne, facade

© Ville de Montréal. Gestion des documents et archives (D-70-2), © Héritage Montréal

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Château Dufresne
1925
© Atelier d’histoire d’Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, © Héritage Montréal

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Interior, Chateau Dufresne, Sherbrooke Street
Bruce McNeil
Circa 1930
20 cm x 26 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal

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Hall, Chateau Dufresne, Sherbrooke Street
Bruce McNeil
Circa 1930
25 cm x 20 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal

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Ladies' sitting room, Chateau Dufresne, Sherbrooke Street
Bruce McNeil
Circa 1930
25 cm x 20 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal