Neighbourhood - Buildings

Former Dawes Brewery



History

Entrepreneur Thomas Dawes founded the Dawes Brewery in 1811 on the banks of the Lachine Canal. When he died, his two sons, Thomas and James, took over the company. When James died, his two sons went into business with their uncle Thomas. One of these two grandsons, Andrew James, eventually assumed ownership of the company and became president of National Breweries Ltd., a group of breweries including the Dawes Brewery. This company was the first in Canada to employ the telegraph, using it to communicate between its Lachine facility and offices downtown. A true family business, the company continued to be run by other descendants (including Norman J., Kenneth T., and Donald) between 1921 and 1952, although the brewery shut down its Lachine operations in 1927. After that, the buildings were used for various purposes: a candle factory, the sale and repair of household articles, and now a museum. The Maison du Brasseur (Brewer's home), Vieille Brasserie (Old Brewery), and Pavillon de l'Entrepôt (Warehouse) now make up the Guy-Descary Cultural Complex.

Image : HM_ARC_004292

Cooperage, Dawes Brewery, Lachine
Circa 1920
25 cm x 20 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal

Image : HM_ARC_004293

Production line, Dawes Brewery, Lachine, QC, about 1920
Circa 1920
25 cm x 20 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal

Image : HM_ARC_004296

Brewing kettles, Dawes Brewery, Lachine
Circa 1920
25 cm x 20 cm
© McCord Museum, © Héritage Montréal