Neighbourhood - Buildings

Former Dawes Brewery



Achitecture

The Dawes site was once occupied by various facilities, including a malting plant, a brewery, warehouses, fields for cultivating hops and barley, and pastureland. In addition to an 1811 brewery wall and an adjacent building added in 1933, four of these buildings are still standing: the home of Thomas Dawes, two warehouses, and the brewery itself.

Aside from those of the 1933 building, which are of brick, the foundations and load-bearing walls are all of fieldstone. The buildings vary in design: one has two hip pavilion roofs and a square chimney hood, while another has a high, narrow chimney. The most remarkable is the Warehouse building, with its double-sloping roof, wood beam frame, seemingly random window placement, and arched basement passageways. Today it houses the Dawes collection. The working-class neighbourhood that grew up around the brewery is an important reminder of the existence and impact of this Old Lachine industry.

Image : HM_ARC_005421

Dawes Brewery under construction

17.8 cm x 12.7 cm
© Ville de Montréal. Gestion des documents et archives (D3050.15-A(4)), © Héritage Montréal

Image : HM_ARC_005420

Rear view of the Brewery Dawes

17.8 cm x 12.7 cm
© Ville de Montréal. Gestion des documents et archives (D3050.15-A(3)), © Héritage Montréal